Leo Gabin

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Leo Gabin

Work from their oeuvre.

We deliberately chose not to use images directly derived from the film, because we didn’t want them to be like the ‘Crackup’ paintings. But all images used in the paintings are taken from amateurish shot footage in Florida, mostly encountered during our search for imagery for the film. Like always, images find their way onto the canvas because they relate to what we are interested in and currently seeing at the moment online. So there is definitely a clear relation between the two, but the film stands on it’s own. That’s also why we chose to not title the exhibition like the film, but to have an overarching title for both. Our interest has always been in how young people use new media to express themselves and capture their surroundings, which is also present in the film. By using transcripts out of the book there is this fictional aspect to the whole, which is new for our approach to video. We like the fact that the film leaves an uncomfortable feeling, but the use of shocking footage is limited, however there is an abundance available online. It was more interesting to balance on the border of harmless naive and disturbing imagery and using sound to help capture the general mood the book evokes, in our interpretation that is.” – Leo Gabin

Federico Kenis

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Federico Kenis

Work from his oeuvre

“Federico Kenis was born in 1990 in Córdoba, Argentina, where he currently resides. He learned the basics of photography from his father, through a film camera that used to be his. He starts developing his skills as a self-taught photographer, learning through practice itself, several books, and the Internet. In 2009, inspired by graffiti and street art he begins to draw and design under the pseudonym of Ruidológico. In 2010 he takes up his studies in Cinema at university and starts becoming aware of the moving image as a means of expression, both for narrative and non-narrative possibilities.
As an active musician he plays several instruments in two bands: Anticasper and Youngs Against Godard as well as his solo project. Also he takes part as musician, photographer and video maker in the quarters of Ringo Records, an independent label of his city.
In 2012 he devotes himself fully to photography -both film and digital photography-, making it an important part of his every-day life and encompassing various searches. As well, he employs photography as a filter through which he contemplates the real world and intern processes from a holistic gaze.
Nowadays, he experiments by composing with materials and people, in different mediums and interfaces, in a relationship of tension, looking for ambiguous and resonant places in the relation organic/synthetic, abstract/figurative, content/form, chance/cause, virtual/real spaces. Intrigued by the universal concept of noise (both in sound as in the visual), consciousness and changes in state of matter. Obsessed with organic patterns, iridescence and everything that beyond its solid state shows for his eye that reality is transformed by time like a river of liquid information.
More recently he’s exploring gif art, glitch art, video art and concepts like information flows, new and obsolete technologies (and their naturally or sponteaneously generated aesthetics) and social networks.” -Der Greif 

Carl Ostendarp

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Carl Ostendarp

Work from “1989-2007″ at Elizabeth Dee, New York.

“In subversive institutional interventions, Carl Ostendarp transforms two of the Johnson Museum’s galleries with offbeat art selections, intensely pigmented murals, and pulsing music. Following curatorial incursions like Andy Warhol’s “Raid the Icebox,” 1970, and Fred Wilson’s Mining the Museum, 1992, Ostendarp’s installations incorporate—and thereby recontextualize—works from the museum’s collections. The resulting Fat Cakes and Myopic Void (all works 2012) occupy galleries on different floors of the I. M. Pei–designed building, and challenge the site’s material austerity and white walls. Ostendarp’s critique aims beyond physical contexts to challenge modernist metanarratives. With Fat Cakes, he reframes Op, Pop, Abstract Expressionist, and hard-edge prints, and, with Myopic Void, he turns his attention to paintings and sculptures selected from the Johnson’s collections—all in terms of sex, jazz, funk, and psychedelia. These are complex motivations, subcultures, and lifestyles that artists working in past decades often recall in colloquial conversation, but that become whitewashed in formalist discourse. With few women artists featured and most cultural “otherness” found in the music, the visual selections bespeak the hegemonic white American masculinity underlying these GI Bill generations. Ostendarp’s inclusion of works by luminaries and lesser-knowns—John Chamberlain, James Rosenquist, Dan Christensen, Nicholas Krushenick, and their peers—tell of both New York City’s cultural preeminence and a regional museum’s historic biases.

Following the comic biomorphs of Ostendarp’s previously exhibited canvases, Myopic Void’s floor-to-ceiling murals in two pink shades create a womblike space that recalls the world of a John Wesley painting. The lava-lamp lines and hot colors undercut and visually destabilize the paintings. The similar horizon separating the teals of Fat Cakes is less obtrusive at knee height, and appears beneath a crowded installation of prints lined up at eye level. Ostendarp lovingly curates a stoned-guitar and grand-funk-psychedelic sound track for Myopic Voidand a soul- and acid-jazz playlist for Fat Cakes (songs from the two genres yield the works’ respective titles). Ostendarp’s mixtapes offer the idea that curating is a common activity, yet he never loses sight of the fact that expert selections, juxtapositions, and well-chosen themes are required for smartly arranging both art and music—and, in his case, for mustering nostalgia for bygone artistic cultures and attitudes.” - William Ganis, Artforum

Marina Gadonneix

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Marina Gadonneix

Work from >After the Image< @ Kaune, Posnik, Spohr.

Gadonneix‘s works are dialogues within spaces staged along the boundaries of the abstract, creating interesting points of confluence between the history of photography as staging and the history of abstraction. In her series „Removed Landscapes“, only light and abstract forms remind the viewers of existing landscpaes so often only known through photography. Captions like „Niagara Falls“ or „Battle Field“ reveal what the photographed Blue- or Green Boxes simulate and help the viewer to provide the visual with content.

The landscapes are accompanied by a sound installation with texts by Marcelline Delbecq, especially written for the series of images. Between fiction and reality, real landscapes and mental landscapes, vision and drifting, the text, in its written form as well as in its form as a soundscript, may either add to or take away from the images, whose visual impact appeals to what’s happening off screen as well as to what is beyond consciousness.

„After the image“ is a body of work that shows studio installations for the documentation of art works. Again the captions refer to the not visible, absent object, which aura emanates through its surrounding construction and enables the viewer to recreate the situation before his inner eye.

Dom Smith

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Dom Smith

Work from his oeuvre.

“My practice extracts forms from the physical world and reconsiders their image through fragmentation and reordering. The transferability from one state of being to another and then back again provides the basis for my content. This preoccupation has brought about a pattern in my work wherein physical objects and surfaces are re-created as illusionistic 2D paintings. My method utilizes computer-controlled environments to create and manipulate items which come to me from passive seeing in life and from the memory of seeing said items. I build the subjects of the paintings in the computer and then attempt to render them as faithfully as possible into physical presences. I began this work by taking classical surface features such as moldings, cornices, and friezes and breaking them into fragments. I would install these fragments in arrangements suggestive of inherent symbolic relationships. The intelligibility of these relationships originates with liturgical imagery and the hierarchies of symbols in the church.” – Dom Smith

Travis Shaffer

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Travis Shaffer

Work from O White Gods.

“O White Gods designates an ongoing series of new works. These works are a mixed-media exploration of whiteness.” – Travis Shaffer

Ann Lislegaard


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Ann Lislegaard

Work from Crystal World

Crystal World (after J. G. Ballard) is a double channel projection first shown at the Sao Paulo Biennial 2006. In the 3D animation a universe is constructed with architectural structures and a jungle that slowly crystallize. A text, generated from a letter written by the protagonist in J.G. Ballard’s novel The Crystal World (1966), describes a zone of entropy, a process of transformation and crystallization. The animation moves through spaces combining architectural elements of Lina Bo Bardi’s Casa de Vidrio and Oscar Niemeyer’s Matarazzo Pavillion, both in Sao Paulo. The Dead Tree (1969) by Robert Smithson and Untitled, Rope Piece (1970) by Eva Hesse are also installed and re-activated in the animation between other references.”

Louise Lawler

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Louise Lawler

Work from “No Drones” at Metro Pictures, New York.

“In her exhibition “No Drones” at Metro Pictures, Louise Lawler exhibits black-and-white images that are traced from her iconic photographs, printed on vinyl and mounted directly on the wall. Lawler uses her photographs of artworks in museums, private collections, auction houses and storage to continue her complex and ever-evolving consideration of art and objects in their working contexts. Photographs such as Chandelier, a picture of an ornate chandelier at a collector’s home overshadowing Fontana’s Concetto Spaziale in the background, and Hand on Her Back, a plaster cast of a crouching Aphrodite photographed at the New York Academy of Fine Arts, are transformed into reductive outline drawings.

The “tracings” were first shown in her 2013 survey exhibition titled “Adjusted” at the Ludwig Museum, Cologne. Discussing Lawler’s well-known work Salon Hodler and the picture’s various re-presentations the museum’s director Philipp Kaiser writes in the exhibition catalogue, “Salon Hodler, a color photograph taken in the noble home of a collector in Geneva, exists in a variety of [other] formats, as a black-and-white matted print, as a paperweight, a projection in public space, as well as a tracing. […] Whereas the black-and-white version appears as a document of the original work, in the best spirit of structuralism, the traced and enlarged version represents the skeleton of the picture. Having mnemonically lodged in our mind and imagination, the picture resonates merely as its own ghost. [The tracings] demonstrate empirically the further steps that can still be taken to explore the extreme ends and corners of pictures and their contexts.

To produce the traced works Lawler worked with children’s book author, illustrator and artist Jon Buller.

In addition to Philipp Kaiser’s essay, the “Adjusted” catalogue includes texts by Benjamin H.D. Buchloh, Hal Foster and Sven Lütticken. It is available at the gallery along with a coloring book of Lawler’s traced works, “No Drones” glasses, and a selection of open edition traced works.

Louise Lawler has participated in significant group exhibitions such as “The Pictures Generation: 1974-1984” at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Documenta 12 and three Whitney Biennials. She has had one-person exhibitions at Museum Ludwig, Cologne; Albertinum, Dresden; Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, Ohio; Dia: Beacon, New York; Hirschhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington DC; Museum für Gegenwartskunst, Basel; and Portikus, Frankfurt. Her work is represented in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago; Astrup Fearnley Museet, Oslo; Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; Fondation Cartier, Paris; Glenstone Foundation, Potomac, Maryland; Guggenheim Museum, New York; Jumex Collection, Mexico City; Kunstmuseum Basel; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Moderna Museet, Stockholm; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.” – Metro Pictures, New York.

Louis Eisner

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Louis Eisner

Work from Mountain Stream Ringtone.

“Introducing Mountain Stream Ringtone, Belgium’s finest oasis of heightened consciousness.

We bring you peace and awareness through our unique combination of aural satisfaction, visual stimulation and olfactory pleasure. If it pleases you, please inhale deeply and bask in oneness with the universe. Mountain Stream Ringtone provides superior relaxation, rejuvenation, and hydration services.

From our refreshing spring water to our calming decor, we carefully select all that is essential for a well- centered life. You are welcome to breathe in our custom diffused fragrance, take a sip of our revitalizing designer bottled water and gaze at the mesmerizing artwork that surrounds you.

Mountain Stream Ringtone is calling.” – Galerie Rodolphe Janssen

Camille Henrot

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Camille Henrot

Work from The Pale Fox

“Demonstrating the breadth of Henrot’s output, this exhibition comprises an architectural display system, found objects, drawing, bronze and ceramic sculpture and digital images. The Pale Fox articulates our desire to make sense of the world through the objects that surround us. Unfolding like a frieze across the four walls of the gallery, a polymorphous aluminium shelf provides a structure wherein the four points of the compass are aligned with stages in an individual lifecycle, the evolution of technology, philosophical principles of Leibniz and the four Classical elements: fire, water, earth and air. This highly personalised aggregation of distinct systems of thought is presented through an intense accumulation of objects and images encountered within a highly constructed, meditative environment.


The title of Henrot’s exhibition is taken from an anthropological study of the West African Dogon people published by Marcel Griaule and Germaine Dieterlen in 1965. Dogon mythology is thought to incorporate the belief systems of several different cultures, as well as astronomical, mathematical and philosophical systems of thought. Within this meta-narrative, the character of the ‘Pale Fox’ represents disorder and chaos but also creation, bringing about the formation of the sun. 

For Henrot, the fox is an ambivalent animal and a potential model for our primitive selves, thriving on waste and instigating a cycle from which accumulation and excess become productive again. Henrot is interested in entropy and disorder as fertile foundational principles in creative practice and the construction of knowledge. The Pale Fox reveals the element of disorder implicit in any system and the contradiction of this aspect of failure as a condition of its completion. 

Exploring varying scales and chronologies, from the history of the universe to the universe of the artist’s studio, the exhibition becomes a model for information storage and retrieval  – rolled and stacked images become objects, and objects from museum collections are substituted with Ebay purchases and scrolling slideshows on digital picture frames. Henrot relates the construction of knowledge to haptic and sensual experience, reflecting our common desire, evidenced in spheres from the artistic to the domestic, to create model worlds of fantasy and symbolism as a means of inhabiting reality.

The Pale Fox is commissioned and produced in partnership with Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen; Bétonsalon – Centre for art and research, Paris and Westfälischer Kunstverein, Münster, where the exhibition will be presented in 2014-15″