Guillaume Chauvin and Remi Hubert

“In order to study the day, I use my ass the night … From time to time I return to the apartment between noon and two for sleeping. It’s crazy to have arrived there. Fortunately I can still hide it. ” – Emma, 23, Master of Philosophy

“I have been in conflict with my family since I was sixteen. Since I have neither scholarship nor parental assistance, I always took care of myself. ” – Armin, 23, Master of Sociology.

“It happened to me several times in the evening, closing the university, to students at the door … I know it is not easy for them, but I have no choice … ” – Gerard, officer

“I can not go to the University Restaurant every day and I do not go to the Restos du Coeur. So I go to markets and cook for my friends.” – Armin, 23, Master of Sociology.

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Guillaume Chauvin and Remi Hubert

Work from the Paris-Match Competition.

I am borrowing this post heavily from Horses Think, as many of the sites I planned to use as source material yesterday are now moved or otherwise not where I left them. 

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“Paris-Match awarded their annual Grand Prix du Photoreportage Etudiant this week to two French students who submitted a photographic story that apparently presented images documenting the precarious lives of students today and the things they must do to survive.

When the two winners, Guillaume Chauvin and Remi Hubert, both art students at the Ecole Supérieure des Arts Décoratifs of Strasbourg, stood up at the Sorbonne to claim their trophy and prize money, they announced the true nature of their work. The images were not photojournalism but staged images featuring many of their peers.

The winners claimed that the idea was hatched a year ago when they looked at all the work students were competing with for the 2008 prize. They realized that the “world view of this work was limited and seemed more like vacation photographs as opposed to photojournalism. The photographs depicted small children with big wet eyes in order to illustrate the misery abroad.”

Speaking to Le Figaro, Guillaume Chauvin confided that they “wanted to enter the contest in order to show the codes used too often in photojournalism and to prove that something real could be translated into something staged.” – Horses Think

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