Steve Bishop

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Steve Bishop

Work from “It’s Easier To Love Your Song Than It Is To Love You“.

“I opened my mouth to speak, but a much better point was made. This was as much to my surprise as to everyone else’s. Initially stunned, agreement followed. The first few exclaimed “That’s it!” and then soon others “Yes, that’s the answer to this whole thing!” I was right but I didn’t realise why. Not straight away at least. In time I understood what I had said and like everyone else, agreed wholeheartedly. But I had not the slightest inkling of where the thought had come from. In fact, I intended to say something else, but a garbled mix of two sentences using mostly all the same words, but with entirely different meaning, was brought forth to unanimous praise.

Soon my words spread and so did their effect. Further afield at first, in a formation that felt like a growing puddle pushing out the periphery. When a video of the event surfaced, that puddle was smeared everywhere at once. In every pocket of each city, suburb and township, the ideas that those unauthored words had encouraged were proliferating in every forum that would hear them.
Commentators were referring to it as the ‘spark’. But unbeknownst to its followers it was a struck not like flint but like a fumbled cigarette igniting the bush that nonetheless spread into wildfire.

I realised the easiest option was to try to keep my mouth shut from then on. And I felt no shame letting others take what they wanted or needed from it – my words were ringing true and that was the main thing.

I have to admit though that it was very exciting. Flattering words were bestowed upon me and the personal and social benefits flowed. I was aware of time and as I continued to offer no new thinking, I became hypersensitive of people’s attention. I still felt responsible for a unity, to be at the forefront, but I was basking in a fading glow. Right when they expected the most, I had the least to give.”- Steve Bishop

Adham Faramawy




Adham Faramawy

Work from his oeuvre

“Adham Faramawy is an artist who explores changes in perception brought about by the digital age. For this exhibition the artist poses questions around media consumption and the persuasive potential of advertising to reflect and reproduce images of ‘well being’.

Across a landscape of high definition flat screens and sculptural wall and floor works, bodies flex, exhale, and exfoliate to the sedative tone of synthesized audio. Manipulated digitally, where tactile surface interplays between liquid planes, Faramawy shoots staged live performers often using his smart phone, a device, which is symptomatic of a contemporary syndrome of immediacy. Interested in erasing the boundaries of production and presentation the artist accelerates the speed at which live footage can meet the digital screen allowing it to be mediated by the mechanisms of the more familiar filter through which we visualize and conceptualize. Routines of banal choreographed workouts and rejuvenating skin treatments are played out, one on one and up close to the screen, performers often neoprene clad or waxed and polished naked. Carefully staged where human exchange can be computer-mediated, these subjects carry with them the isolated remoteness of the online experience.

For Hydra water is constructed as a luxury product and is abundant. Digital pixels and meditative sound sublimate water into a fetishized fluid counterpart, heightening it’s potential to heal and regenerate thus playing into the increasing anxiety over it’s potential scarcity. Points of hydration or drowning are continuous dichotomies throughout the new body of work, either by performers constantly feeding an unquenchable thirst by drinking water from plastic bottles in post-rave thirst aftermath, or by the animated image dissolving into digitized rippling screens.

As with previous presentations Faramawy will present a series of 3D and 2D works; leaning digital flat screens and cuboid podiums will occupy the space. Paint and pixel oscillate, with surfaces counterpoising colour schemes that reproduce screensaver gradients, proxies for the digital treatment of live footage.  Despite the self-containment of wall and video work the question of which section is ascendant – which is background and which is foreground is open-ended. The artist draws us into an examination of formal points of contact between the physical and non-physical, directing us towards aesthetic histories to bring subjectivity and primacy of experience to the fore. All works are bound together in a sealed world, each requiring the other, their liquid relationship to be read as flowing and symbiotic.”

text from recent exhibition at Cell Project Space

Martin Kohout

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Martin Kohout

Work from BOOSTED EXL5006XL/M and BOOSTED MCK24.OG

Hibernation
is
the
default
metabolic
state
for
some
animals
that
exist
in
this
state
for
the
greater
part
of
the
year
at
times
of
a
metabolic
energy
crisis.

Conversely, up-regulation of metabolism and alertness is a widespread and common survival strategy in response to the availability of energy.”

text via Exile

Gabriele Beveridge

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Gabriele Beveridge

Work from By mistake or design

“Gabriele Beveridge (b.1985) is a London-based artist who creates two-dimensional and three-dimensional collages and installations using sun-faded images and a variety of natural and man-made objects. Through framing, balancing and propping, these disparate elements are brought into precisely constructed but open-ended dialogues. Materials such as sand, copper and marble rub up against the seductive sheen of cosmetics, suggesting poetic associations, psychological states, and a heightened awareness of the surfaces that surround us.” – Zabludowicz Collection

Johan Rosenmunthe

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Johan Rosenmunthe

Work from Enlargements.

“Johan Rosenmunthe’s installation utilizes an image taken from the Empire State Building down on the roofs of Manhattan and shows printed crops and zooms into that single image. Part of the exhibited images are posters pasted directly to the wall, others are ‘framed installations’ of images. The master image is present but monitored by the Nexus CCTV 4-camera surveillance system along with other parts of the installation. The audience will partake in the surveillance of each other during the show. 64 Hammershøj building bricks placed directly on the preserved floor functions as support for a few frames. A laser level constantly confirms the position of bricks, posters and a single frame. The laser line is extended by a line of chalk. All materials at the show is for sale. ” – Johan Rosenmunthe

Émile Claus

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Émile Claus

Work from his oeuvre.

“At the time of his debut, Emile Claus enjoyed fame chiefly as a portrait painter. The Antwerp and Brussels bourgeoisie almost immediately recognised in him the hand of a master, able to capture reality in charming, romantic-realistic showpieces, genre scenes and official portraits. He mastered the landscape well only during a journey to North Africa and Spain in 1879-1880. Suddenly convention disappeared from his work. His outlook became unrestrained, his touch powerful and his application of paint, thick. Romantic-realism would never again return in his bravado pieces.

He would gradually direct his antennae outside Antwerp and Belgium, and became acquainted with naturalism. The naturalists preferred depicting everyday life in the city and especially in the countryside. In essence, it was a sequel to realism, albeit with the sharp, social-critical edges smoothed. The monumental landscape paintings that Claus sent to the exhibitions in 1880s were all naturalistic in nature, while he gradually showed himself to be sensitive to French impressionism. Despite the great success he enjoyed with his naturalistic exhibition pieces at the major exhibitions in Brussels and Paris, he was looking for a different way. The sharp, photographic realism and the picturesque anecdotal character so characteristic for the period around 1886-1887, were gone two years later. Claus was more than forty years old when he was confronted with the most important revolution in his career. He withdrew from the official circuit from which he obtained much support, and for three winters long lived in an atelier in Paris. He gradually came under the spell of the French impressionists, and back at the home front, he incorporated their technique into his own work. However, his paintings were never really French. Even the light had a more northern tint than that of his French predecessors. This shimmering light received form via a nervous touch capable of bringing about a magnificent harmony via a wide range of short and long strokes. However spontaneous his paintings may appear, they were always the fruit of a thoroughgoing study. They are all the result of passionate study. This manner of working persisted for almost fifteen years, until the beginning of the war.” – Oscar Devos

Michael Krebber

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Michael Krebber

Work from his oeuvre.

“‘Real art has the capacity to make us nervous’, writes Susan Sontag in her essay ‘Against Interpretation’ (1966), and this is exactly what one can expect when encountering Michael Krebber’s work. In his exhibition ‘London Condom’ at Maureen Paley 21 canvases of equal size depict extracts from Krebber’s recent lecture ‘Puberty in Painting’. The series was realized by a professional signwriter on top of black and white screen prints based on French Western comics. There are energetic cowboys, romantic embraces and a thoughtful-looking, lonesome hero whose image and speech-bubble thoughts are covered by random excerpts from the lecture. These include lines such as ‘painting is such a wonderful little subject, such an exciting subject’ and ‘the wonderful photos in the Feldmann exhibition’.

‘London Condom’ is the final instalment of three shows featuring this new series of works by the artist, recently shown at Daniel Buchholz, Cologne, under the title ‘Respekt Frischlinge’ (Respect Fledglings) and at Chantal Crousel, Paris, as ‘Je suis la chaise’ (I Am the Chair). Each of the exhibitions included a different selection from the 90 canvases that comprise the series. By using different titles in the countries’ native languages for each show, Krebber imposed a certain autonomy on each of the exhibitions, as well as creating a superficial local connection. However, rather than taking up the subject of the works, the titles added to the exhibitions’ complexity and reflected Krebber’s idiosyncratic humour.

Although the works in this series are reminiscent of John Baldessari’s text paintings from the 1960s, as well as of Pop art’s appropriations of comic strips, Krebber is explicitly interested neither in the ironic self-referentiality of text as image nor in the mechanical reproduction of popular culture’s flat imagery. The similarities exist only on a formal level. This kind of referencing has always played a significant role in Krebber’s artistic practice – in the past he has turned Georg Baselitz-esque paintings on their head or used, like Sigmar Polke, kitsch fabrics as canvases.

The starting-point for Krebber’s series was his lecture on painting, However, once the words reach the canvas, their meaning changes. A shift from content to form takes place, and the text begins to function as a ready-made. Graphically strong, it merges uncomfortably with the seemingly random selection of repetitive comic-strip imagery. Grainy, dark and partially cut off at the edges, the screen prints are reminiscent of cheap photocopies and render the text fragments almost illegible in places. In their state of painterly vagueness, the works echo the lecture, in which he stated that painting is something ‘which is just undefined and wholly contradictory in itself’.

The press release, which discusses the Hollywood Western Red River (1948), was written by fellow artist John Kelsey. The text takes up the Western theme of the exhibition, but rather than relating explicitly to the images on display, Kelsey’s writing provides another layer of meaning. Red River’s Howard Hawks and John Wayne are described as bossy and macho pals, while Montgomery Clift, whose image is shown on the invitation card for ‘London Condom’, comes across as an outsider and a greenhorn in the film industry. This Hollywood scenario leads back to Krebber, who takes on the role of ‘the lonesome cowboy’ amid the ‘stampede’ that is the art market. ‘Like painting, cattle must be driven to the market,’ Kelsey writes. However, Krebber is anything but new to the art world, and Kelsey’s text makes it clear that Krebber is very much aware of his market clout.

With his deliberate avoidance of a signature style, Krebber is not an artist who is eager to please. In the past he has exhibited a Laurel and Hardy postcard, canvases made from cheetah-patterned fabric and paintings that were partially covered by exhibition posters. Unlike the current series, some of the artist’s previous works have shown traces of his physical involvement. In his exhibition at the Secession, Vienna, in 2005 the impressively sized main space was left almost empty, displaying only a small number of works; earlier exhibitions showed barely anything at all. The context of the gallery space, in particular the formal relationship between the work and its immediate surroundings, is crucial to Krebber’s artistic practice. In ‘London Condom’ he grouped the canvases into clusters of three, four or six, enclosing one of the corners of the gallery wall. In a show at Greene Naftali, New York, in 2003 his paintings were leaning against the wall, while at the Secession the works were framed and hung, conventionally, at eye-level. Krebber shows that the wall is the logical extension of the painting’s surface and that painting is therefore intrinsically linked with exploring its own environment.

The ‘London Condom’ works are characterized by a visual indecisiveness, However, with its system of loose connections as well as what Kelsey called Krebber’s ‘empty appropriations’ of recent art history, this exhibition was a clear reflection of the artist’s understanding of painting.” – Bettina Brunner

Laturbo Avedon

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Laturbo Avedon

Work from Sunset at Mt. Gox

“Laturbo Avedon is an artist, but not a real person. On Avedon’s FacebookTwitterSoundCloud and Tumblr pages, pieces of an identity can be gleaned of an ostensibly female character: Selfies of a glamorous blonde taken in different virtual environments; pitch-shifted remixes of pop songs by Kylie Minogue and Justin Timberlake; a first Tweet asking “A/S/L?” Laturbo Avedon is an artist-avatar without a real world referent, a digital manifestation of a person that does not and has never existed outside of a computer.

For her first exhibition at webspace.gallery, Avedon has erected an equally virtual monument to Mt. Gox: The Tokyo-based Bitcoin exchange that disappeared in February this year along with nearly half a billion U.S. dollars worth of bitcoins. For the duration of the exhibition, visitors to webspace.gallery are encouraged to anonymously submit images and 3D objects to be left at the monument on their behalf. Every second day, new renders of the monument will be uploaded, showing the various acts of vigil, or vandalism requested by visitors. A video of the monument will be uploaded on April 14 to document the end-result of this month-long process.”-webspace.gallery

Lorne Blythe

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Lorne Blythe

Work from his oeuvre

“Lorne Blythe uses the still life to investigate how photography has historically shaped and manipulated the way we see the world, and to transform simple structures into forms loaded with mental or metaphysical qualities. In his photographs of tooth brushes, white sugar cubes and pink Gillette razors piled before pastel studio backdrops, Blythe removes these industrial devices from their accepted context, transforming them into miniature sculptures.”

via Culturehall

Scott Reeder

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Scott Reeder

Work from 365 Mission

“On view through March 16 at 356 South Mission Road, Scott Reeder has created something akin to the abandoned set of a film in process, which it may in fact be. According to IMDB, Reeder is in post-production on a film called Moon Dust starring some one named Tyrone Love. This show is comprised of clunky constructions of brightly colored space ship interiors that remind me of Flash Gordon and even its goofy porn film spoof, Flesh Gordon.

If Pee Wee Herman ever devised a space ship to transport him to the outer limits, it might look like this installation. Tangerine snack bar, lemony console, ultraviolet lounge with views of a galaxy far, far away. One wall is covered in large panels painted in atmospheric colors with a roller while other vibrant paintings offer hand drawn lists of names and ideas, many of them quite funny. “Lazy vs. Ugly” as a potential exhibition title? The sets have already been the background for Reeder and his brother Tyson Reeder’s performances but they activate the imagination even without the participation of the artist.”

text via Art Talk on KCRW