Jasmine Clarke

Jasmine Clarke

Work from Shadow of the Palm.

” When I look in the mirror, I want to believe that what I am seeing is an extension of myself even though I know that it isn’t. I’m seeing a reflection (an illusion) of me and my world. I can never quite trust a mirror.

A picture creates a similar false sense of reality. The nature of photography tells us that what we are seeing is true, but it’s not. It is a selective truth, or even a fiction.

One night in Jamaica, as my father and I drove through the mountains, he described a recurring dream: he is in his hometown, Saint Mary’s, at a certain winding road that’s shaped like an N, trying to catch the bus. He misses it and has to run up the mountain through the bush and slide down the other side to catch it. This is his only dream set in Jamaica. He told me as we approached the N. I listened while chewing on my sugar cane. It’s strange hearing about a dreamscape while physically going through it—like déjà vu.

I feel this sense of familiarity driving through my father’s dream. But what’s more overwhelming is the sensation of jamais vu: foreignness in what should be known. The moon you see, the air you breathe, and the flowers you smell are all suddenly unfamiliar. You’ve moved, traveled—maybe even transcended—although you don’t know to where. You look in the mirror and see yourself, but can’t be sure that it’s the same reflection you saw yesterday.

This is why I photograph: to capture a trace of the unexplainable. My pictures are where dreams meet the physical world and earthly things take on higher meaning. I search for the uncanny. I uncover what is hidden. An obscured face, a wet flower, a dark shadow.” – Jasmine Clarke

Welly Fletcher

Welly Fletcher

Work from Elephant Shoe.

“I’ve been thinking about elephants a lot- especially their feet. Their low frequency communications travel beneath the ground, and then elephants ”hear” through their feet, along with their ears. Elephant expression of grief is LOUD, STRONG, FULL. We are lucky to overlap with them; we could learn a lot about living by learning to listen better.

I’ve been thinking about queerness, too. What it is today; how my thoughts and perspectives have shifted in my 43 years. How queerness is, for me, a form of resistance, difference, love, non-normative life-being-lived. Queerness is paying enough attention to know what normative is, and what power-structures hold it up, and how I can more intentionally pursue other options, to be active in my dismantling.

We have so much to learn from other ways of living, other types of life. Our particular flavor of human stupidity can be so harmful. Our consciousness can be so unconscious and unconscientious; careless, selfish, with extremely high costs. It hurts to witness, and to be a part of. I turn to elephants, and others, seeking alternate ways forward. I’m a big believer that sculpture, too, can be an antidote to some of the particular dis-eases we suffer from today, through its offering of embodied, intersectional, poetic encounters.

My partner told me that when a person silently says ”elephant-shoe,” it looks a lot like ”I love you.” So, elephant-shoe: elephants, coyotes, fish, birds, insects, rock, metal, trees, clay, di rt – al I these forms of intelligence far (far, far, far) superior to the regular human kind…

And elephant-shoe to you, too. Thanks for witnessing this new work.-” Welly Fletcher

Jeffery Meris

Jeffery Meris

Work from Catch a Stick of Fire.

“Jeffrey Meris’s hanging sculptures, reminiscent of chandeliers, are made of aluminium piping, ceramic vessels, and spider plants. These materials, along with Meris’s shift from working with steel and iron to aluminum, a lighter, and, as Meris says, a more “intimate” metal—often found in domestic spaces for plumbing—can be seen as a metaphor for the shift in the artist’s practice, once centered around conversations of racialized trauma, to one focused on a steadfast devotion to healing, cleansing, and rituals of care.” – James Cohan Gallery

Jacolby Satterwhite

Jacolby Satterwhite

Work from his oeuvre.

“Through performance, video, 3D animation, installation, and sculpture, Jacolby Satterwhite explores themes of memory, desire, and ritual. He is interested in process as a metanarrative: the narrative between past, present, and future, and how that process relates a broad, shared experience. Often using his mother’s drawings as a resource (she created thousands of schematics and inventions centered on consumer culture, medicine, sex, astrology, and philosophy), he propagates her two-dimensional gestures and contextualizes related themes. His visual dialogue reads something like an extraterrestrial journal, a poetic scape where there is no sense of physical place and no parameters of time. Satterwhite’s methods are radical, and the imagery surreal, yet he maintains a visual course of formalist aesthetics and composition.” – Morán Morán

Rick Silva and Nicolas Sassoon

Rick Silva and Nicolas Sassoon

Work from CORES.

It is well worth seeing the videos (that I could not embed without issue) and reading the essay for each fragment.

“Here, on the lithosphere, where the earth meets the sky, there exists a long history of how rocks and stones can be seen as images and can be read as texts. A multitude of worlds has been interpreted through surfaces of stones as they depict worlds.[1] Imaginary or not, they reflect historical events — a vertiginous array of scales, landscapes, and — sometimes — ruined cities. But they also include abstract forms and lines that offer geological points of origin for questions, including those of art and aesthetics. From the poetics of stones to the geological, we are nowadays more likely to count, classify, and catalogue than romanticise: geological surfaces and stratifications are measured and mapped such as in the cartographic codes for lithographic patterns. From sandy and silty dolomite to sandstone and shale, quartzite and granite to igneous rock the surface and subsurface are a slowly-unfolding inscription of different minerals.

The following … fragments are reflections on rocks, technicity, duration, and place evoked by CORES, the series of digital animations featuring 3D-scanned rocks by Rick Silva and Nicolas Sassoon.” – CORES

Sadie Barnette

Sadie Barnette

Work from Inheritance.

“This new body of work uses installation, sculpture, photography, wallpaper and large-scale drawing to examine the artist’s familial legacy. Employing archival material–such as the 500-page dossier compiled by the FBI surveilling her father, Rodney Barnette, during his time in the Black Panther Party–the artist wields the personal nature of generational inheritance to inflect international political struggle with urgency, collapsing temporal distinctions of past and present. The solo presentation at the gallery runs simultaneously with the two-venue exhibition, Sadie Barnette: Legacy and Legend, at Benton Museum of Art at Pomona College and Pitzer College Art Galleries, on view until December 18, 2021…” – Jessica Silverman Gallery

Rachel Youn

Rachel Youn

Work from their oeuvre.

“Rachel Youn is an artist living and working in St. Louis, MO. They use sculpture and new media to poke fun at hierarchal narratives embedded in objects and lifestyles. Sourcing from home furnishing stores and oriental goods peddled on craigslist, their work collapses notions of authenticity and artifice through the lens of identity” – bio via De:Formal

SANGREE

SANGREE

Work from their oeuvre.

“SANGREE is the first
SANGREE is a well know figure among contortion enthusiasts
SANGREE is unavailable
SANGREE is from 5 to 8 pm from now on
SANGREE is away
SANGREE is well known in the vicinity
SANGREE is a subdivision
SANGREE is a throwback
SANGREE is plotting
SANGREE is rife with philosophical debate and charged with enough sexual tension to ignite a water park
SANGREE is born
SANGREE is opened
SANGREE is part of the group
SANGREE is based on the true story of a bride who ran away with her lover on her wedding night
SANGREE is an extraordinarily unique horror film that takes the viewer on an unforgettable trip following the life of an insane ex
SANGREE is abuzz with activity and news these days
SANGREE is the closest you’re going to get to a genuinely psychological and intelligent truth.
SANGREE is a psychedelic freudian exploration of the mind’s and of culture’s attitude towards sexuality and repression as told through a slasher film
SANGREE is one of the brightest new bands i have seen in a long time
SANGREE is a haunting
SANGREE is a medium maturing
SANGREE is setting a new standard for the hardcore and metal scene
SANGREE is a spanish word
SANGREE is a poetic masterpiece
SANGREE is pura too motherfucker
SANGREE is not a deep one
SANGREE is a certain woman who has three forms
SANGREE is arguably the best
SANGREE is an early
SANGREE is formed from the proverbial ashes of another victim
SANGREE is a wonderful animal
SANGREE is relatively weak in combat
SANGREE is a drug lord skilled in the art of black magic
SANGREE is considered good for baking and boiling
SANGREE is a tough horse
SANGREE is a bitch
SANGREE is the official journal of the entire world
SANGREE is available in a wide variety of media formats
SANGREE is a powerful and violent film that does not follow normal conventions
SANGREE is about doing it to yourself
SANGREE is by far my fave
SANGREE is mysterious
SANGREE is the code
SANGREE is the love
SANGREE is for everyone

They started working collaboratively in 2009 on an homologue photography zine that meant to explore the most puzzling subjects on human history through images made by the artists. This visual investigation on many different subjects such as nature, technology, popular culture, the cosmos, history, etc progressively migrated to different media giving way to the creation of two ever-growing archives: a photography and a drawing one. Both archives are continuously being updated and are regarded as pools of ideas from which different projects may emerge.

The extensive range of subjects they have explored throughout a decade has led them to develop an interest in materiality and the use of different kinds of media which spans from traditional techniques, to craftful hand made processes, to large scale architectural installations.” – SANGREE

Camille Jodoin-Eng

Camille Jodoin-Eng

Work from their oeuvre.

“Camille Jodoin-Eng’s work approaches the interplay between physical and psychological space by engaging with spatial and sensory properties such as light, dimensions, and perspectives. Often inspired by shrines and temples as spaces devoted to reflecting on otherworldly existences, her work engages with repetition and symbology to create a physical manifestation of infinite space. Jodoin-Eng has developed a studio practice that involves drawing, sculpture, fabrication, installation, and a growing visual language of personal symbols.” – Patel Brown

Leonard Suryajaya

Leonard Suryajaya

Work from False Idol.

“… Leonard Suryajaya’s series False Idols pushes the boundaries of representation of his/our intimate relationships. Using his loved ones as subjects in his bizarre play, Suryajaya creates elaborate scenes that are beautiful, absurd and at times disturbing. He works with several different mediums to stretch our point of view on immigration and culture norms. Suryajaya’s collages are immediately curious and unusual, yet at the same time highlight a tenderness that is very familiar. Along with photographs and video, Suryajaya also uses text as part of his imagery, words appear handwritten in installations, prints are created from his text chains, or emails superimposed into his images. The mix of words and images create an elaborate stage for multi-generational and racially diverse cast who perform his unique visual language. In the end, his work highlights that being different comes at an awkward emotional cost even though it’s something we all understand.

Play, Mess, and imagination all touch within the frames of Leonard Suryajaya. There are exquisite disruptions of patterns and people. fingertips buzzing, the colorful leaves of plastics and fruits, and mouths almost always stuffed with something extraterrestrial. Suryajaya photographs, films, and makes art of something equally unexpected, as it is familiar and ancestral. False Idol explores themes of camaraderie and theatre, fleeing a homeland and putting down roots. A Chinese-Indonesian immigrant, Suryajaya is ready for powers and authorities that want to question the legitimacy of his every last morsel. “I’m going to make this work over the course of my Green Card application. I want to use this body of work as a way to document, reimagine, and expose that process”.

Suryajaya is possessed by navigating respect with pushiness. The rules of government and patriarchy are in place to watch and pry; the works of False Idol fight back with astute dexterity. Why simplify anything? In these works there is bargaining and resilience. The world that lurks inside Suryajaya’s frames seems both informed by an established visual history as much as it seeks to find a new place in the future on a planet not too dissimilar from this one. Or perhaps that place is still Earth, one where limitations have been outsmarted. Where the bizarre, unexpected, and queer can co-mingle and couple.

Suryajaya stands in the middle of streets, collecting, gathering, thinking, and finding all these simple things so they can be exposed for how outlandish they are capable of being. Our world no longer has to be what we’ve come to expect of its we’re better than that, this world deserves better than us if we can’t push ourselves towards the discovery that combining opposites will empower us. Our trauma is real and will make things difficult. We will either be for one another or we will be against one another. Suryajaya offers us this confusion as a tool to see possibility.” – Carrie Levy for CENTER.