Miles Greenberg


Miles Greenberg

Work from LATE OCTOBER (performers and collaborators listed in the link).

“The Black body as infrastructure for the divine, the Black body as a vessel, the Black body as a generative and re-generative terrain, in Permanent Readiness for the Marvellous; the Black body as the liminal; the Black body as the cusp of the cup that runneth over – the threshold is a means of survival.” – Miles Greenberg

Arthur Ou

Arthur Ou

Work from A Day of Times.

“When we think about the future of the world, we always have in mind its being at the place where it would be if it continued to move as we see it moving now. We do not realize that it moves not in a straight line, but in a curve, and that its direction constantly changes.

– Ludwig Wittgenstein, from “Culture and Value,” 1929

Brennan & Griffin is pleased to present A Day of Times, a solo exhibition of a new series by Arthur Ou. This is the artist’s third exhibition at the gallery.

Over the course of a day, from dawn until dusk, on October 21st, 2016, Ou made a sequence of exposures from a particular vantage point overlooking the Point Reyes coast in California. These 8×10 inch negatives were then used to produce a series of large scale analog prints that Ou hand tints with waxed pigment. The gradiated palette sits upon the surface like a thin veil, generating a play between color and surface, texture and light, depth and flatness. Each print is a unique work, extending the relationship between photography to the process of painting and drawing. ” – Kathryn Brennan Gallery

Grant Gill

Grant Gill

Work from Primary Magic.

“To be gay, at least during the time and place I came into my own identities, meant a varying level of removal from the heterosexual man. I have observed that the cause of this is for two reasons. The first, I must admit, is my own burden. It is the manifestation of gay desire and the fear of expressing it in visual or physical ways. The second is the expectations and stigma created by the evolution of traditional masculinity into toxic masculinity. Not only does gayness give emphasis to one’s otherness, it becomes conflated with the threat to the heterosexual’s sexuality. What the homosexual represents to toxic masculinity is a temptation of all things that have previously been cemented and understood.

Expressing love or desire with the male homosexual, as a male heterosexual, would, as Foucault once said, ‘cancel everything that can be troubling in affection, tenderness, friendship, fidelity, camaraderie, and companionship, things that our rather sanitized society can’t allow a place for without fearing the formation of new alliances and the tying together of unforeseen lines of force.’ To love a queer man is to be queer oneself, and this love can exist outside of sexuality. To be romanced and to have sex are not synonymous acts of love, and to see love as such is a dangerous territory to live in.

Primary Magic is a body of photographic work that looks at male friendship as a ritual practice outlined by a number of self-ascribed queer and magical qualities: desire, flexibility, performance, transformation, and the return. Over various excursions and vacations with two male friends that I have come to love dearly, we practiced exercises in intimacy, played out fantasies specific to my own gay desires, and bonded in ways that created new lines of communication that I have never experienced with straight men in the past.” – Grant Gill

Quayola

Quayola

Work from Sculpture Factory.

“Sculpture Factory, the work by Quayola […] extends the reach of these new spaces onto the factory floor. The artist displays the construction of one of his unfinished sculptures as a performative sculpture in itself. For eight weeks, a robotic milling machine chips away at blocks of material, producing a series of ‘unfinished’ sculptures – works which have been extended and dismantled by glitch.

The work brings process – rather than outcome – to the fore. Visitors to the exhibition can see the live translation of code to material, as manipulated digital renderings of Michaelangelo sculptures are whittled from white blocks.

“There is a very complex geometry to it, but actually this is really determined by the size of the drill bit and how it is moving through the block […] This is not something that has been designed on 3D software. It’s just a result of a series of operations and the process of the machine.” – Quayola remarks in an interview with the Creators Project.

The relationship between art and process heavily informs Quayola’s working process. The notion of ‘algorithmic creativity’ could be described in many ways; the sculptures produced by the industrial machines in Sculpture Factory are one such description. Another, more bodily description is the tangible, temporal impact the performance of the machines has on space and materials – the ‘sculptor’ has been programmed to produce something which, by hovering close to classical aesthetic ideas, disrupts them owing to the difference in process.” – text via Sedition Art

Jinwoo Hwon Lee

Jinwoo Hwon Lee

Work from Tell Them I said Hello.

“I was 19, when I came back by myself to the United States since being a toddler.

I did not speak what everyone spoke. I knew no one. People in the small town noticed me by my color. Koreans born and raised in America thought I was too ‘Korean’. People back home thought I was too ‘American’. I was neither one of us nor one of them.

The physical and emotional distance between two homes never resolved. However, learning to cope with a sense of alienation enabled me to see others undergo their own.

The eclectic black and white photographs in this series reflect such emotions. No images in the series fully show a face of a person. Despite taken by the same photographer, no images were taken in the same locations. This signifies the scattered identity and also metaphors the perceptions created both inside and outside. As a citizen and as an immigrant, I never felt fully understood or wholeheartedly considered. Some nuances were always dismissed.

The seemingly disjointed objects and people in the series portray the alienated in different settings. The loose strings among the photographs, as metaphors and firsthand testimonies, invite viewers to imagine their own context of alienation. Despite its disparity, true subject of the series reaches the struggles experienced as the vulnerable; the rejected; and the departed from and within.

This body of work is part of the ongoing ‘Poem-ography’ series, in which both poetry and photography are realized in one medium – regardless of presence of text.” – Jinwoo Hwon Lee

Billie Zangewa

Billie Zangewa

Work from her oeuvre.

“Billie Zangewa’s background is as an engaged artist. A golden-fingered embroiderer, she has gradually garnered recognition on the African and international art scene. Her autobiographical works skilfully combine personal experience with universal subjects, from the hustle and bustle of urban megalopolises to ordinary activities in the life of a woman and mother in today’s world. Daily life thus serves as a pretext to engage in a political reflection on identity which insightfully challenges gender stereotypes and racial prejudices.

The artist is now taking her work in a new direction, moving away from purely domestic scenes to tackle topics with more of a universal and timeless dimension. Scraps of silk and various colourful, shiny textiles mingle delicately in the exhibition’s ten or so figurative compositions, painting narrative portraits that extol love in all its many facets. As the artist explains, ‘The exhibition is entitled Soldier of Love because I believe that especially at this time in history that we live in, universal and personal love is something that we have to fight for. I consider myself a soldier of love.'” – Galerie Templon

Jesse Ly

Jesse Ly

Work from Image Interference @ BasketShop.

“Through the process of both creation and experience of discursive depictions, Image Interference balances both the appearance of indexical truth and anecdotal nature of photographic imagery. Within the foreground lies the viewer transitional experience from presentation to impression. Reckoning with the varying nuances from what once was and now appears before the viewer, but in the form of a flattened and cropped view, allows for changing perspectives that directly create liminal spaces. Adjustments that move the individual view to including and understanding the view of others addresses this gap and expands the photographic dialog from “what is here,” to “how is it here and why.” These concerns and notions further divide these gaps that allow bleeding into more specific concerns in relation to identity. In the case of this work, pertinent concerns directly address facets of relationships, nostalgia, passing moments, racial disparity, melancholy and appreciation. This deconstruction incites a willingness to transcend and further understand these disparities of viewing, in terms of both photographic and actuality. Coming into these compositions from the array of varying and subversive experiences every person holds creates differentiation subjected to the photographs. This questioning within photographic complexity extends the conversation of the continual necessity of image making and instigates these pursuits to further understand what directly comes from and differentiates in these pulls from reality.” – Jesse Ly

Widline Cadet


Widline Cadet

Work from her oeuvre.

“Widline Cadet (b. 1992 in Pétion-Ville, Haiti; currently lives and works in New York) is a Haitian-born artist. Her practice draws from personal history and examines race, memory, erasure, migration, and Haitian cultural identity from a viewpoint within the United States. She uses photography, video, and installations to construct a visual language that explores notions of visibility and hypervisibility, black feminine interiority, and selfhood.”

Karolina Wojtas

Karolina Wojtas

Work from The Extremely Rich Fauna of the Local Area.

“…No sense in assuming an academic tone, we’re in the woods, after all. Peculiarities abound. Here the hedgehogs can be coniferous or deciduous, occasionally mixed. Vegetarian lions prance through the meadows. Snails and deer: they’ve both got horns. Otherwise you grasp for similarities in vain. A squirrel suffering from amnesia cannot recall where it hid its salubrious nuts last autumn. The butterflies while away the hours tracing nonsensical poems in the heated air. They say that butterflies are the souls of wilted flowers. Most likely this doesn’t concern domesticated flowers—perhaps this is why it is so hard to tame a butterfly. We make all these conjectures, however, with no scientific basis. There are too many butterflies and flowers here to make room for scientists. And only every so often the light flashes, and the woods fall still. The woodpecker stabs his beak into a tree trunk. The wolves stretch open their mouths. Silence falls. The cage closes, everyone keeps on drinking from the mud puddle.” – This text was based upon Zbigniew Batko’s novel Z powrotem, czyli fatalne skutki niewłaściwych lektur [Returning, or: The Dire Consequences of Reading the Wrong Books] (Warsaw, 1985). Edited by: Nadia Dziurdzia via TFHKoncept

THE FACULTY OF SENSING – Thinking With, Through, and by Anton Wilhelm Amo

THE FACULTY OF SENSING – Thinking With, Through, and by Anton Wilhelm Amo at Kunstverein Braunschweig.

“With THE FACULTY OF SENSING – Thinking With, Through, and by Anton Wilhelm Amo, Kunstverein Braunschweig has worked in close cooperation with Bonaventure Soh Bejeng Ndikung to develop a project in honor of Anton Wilhelm Amo, an outstanding philosopher of the 18th century. On the basis of Amo’s writings and their reception, highly topical issues of referentiality, erasure, and canonization will be discussed.

In a 2013 essay The Enlightenment’s ‘Race’ Problem, and Ours for the New York Times’ philosophy page The Stone, Justin E. H. Smith wonders how and why philosophers like Immanuel Kant or David Hume could afford to be so explicitly racist, at a period when a contemporary of theirs Anton Wilhelm Amo was excelling as a philosopher. The explanation for this can be found in processes of erasure in relation to what Michel-Rolph Trouillot has called ‘Silencing the Past’.

Anton Wilhelm Amo (* around 1700 — † after 1753) is considered to be the first Black academic and philosopher in Germany. His work was largely pushed to the margins and rendered obscure. Amo studied philosophy and law in Halle and positioned himself with his dissertations on the mind-body problem (1734) at the University of Wittenberg and Treatise on the Art of Philosophising Soberly and Accurately (1738) as an early thinker of the Enlightenment.

Anton Wilhelm Amo was abducted from the territory of present-day Ghana as an infant, enslaved, and taken via Amsterdam to Wolfenbüttel at the court of Duke Anton Ulrich. It was here that he began his academic career.

As part of the extensive research and exhibition project, 16 international artists and groups were invited to respond to the philosophical thought of Anton Wilhelm Amo in largely newly produced works. Curatorially, the project develops around questions of Amo’s understanding of the thing-in-itself, the discourse of body and soul, the legal status and recognition of Black people in the 18th century and the present time, transcendental homelessness, the politics of naming, and the narrative and history of the Enlightenment.

The exhibition is accompanied by an extensive public program of performances, artist talks, workshops, and discussions. As part of this, a symposium with international scholars and artists will take place. More detailed information will follow in due course.

A publication will be produced alongside the exhibition THE FACULTY OF SENSING – Thinking With, Through, and by Anton Wilhelm Amo, linking theoretical and artistic contributions to the exhibition and the symposium.” –